Teen Interview #22

Bryce Ann Hartzell, 16.


So, are you a singer?

Yeah, mostly. I also produce and manage shows.

What bands or groups do you produce and manage shows for?

Mostly my own band; and currently I’m only managing one other group called Gemi. I have managed quite a few bands in the past, though.

What inspired you to get into music?

My uncle actually passed away, and he left me his most prized possession. It was his elevation guitar, and I felt like it was something I needed to learn, because you can’t put something that special into a closet somewhere.

Do you write your own songs?

I do: I’ve taken a few songwriting classes at SOTA and it’s helped me write my own songs but I started writing them when I was about 12 or 13.

What instruments do you play?

I play the guitar, piano, bass… I’m trying to learn the drums, and I play the ukulele, but, not often because it’s an instrument that not many people want to hear anymore.

What type of music are you in to, and what type do you play?

I’m actually into a lot of different genres of music; I like to listen to everything because I feel like you can pull inspiration from everything. I do prefer to listen to rap, indie, and slow stuff like that; and I mostly play indie or alternative rock.

Do you think it’s important to have role models?

I think people wouldn’t be able to shape themselves as authentically if they didn’t have role models. Role models play a big part in kids and teenagers finding who they want to be, and the qualities that they want to possess, along with their views about the world and their treatment of it. Role models also affect kids’ and teenagers’ self-worth and self-treatment.

Who have some of your role models been?

My mom is one of my biggest role models; I feel like a lot of people say that, but she’s just inspired me to be really strong because she’s had to be strong her whole life. But in terms of celebrities or famous people, I have some really strong feminist role models like Halsey, and even weirder people like Mac DeMarco just because a lot of them are carefree and they don’t really care what other people think. And they just do their own things.

Role models play a big part in kids and teenagers finding who they want to be, and the qualities that they want to possess, along with their views about the world and their treatment of it.

Where do you want to take your music?

The dream is to be famous one day; the dream is to be a pop star. Realistically though, I’m applying to music colleges in Europe and I think the route I’m wanting to go is making money off of touring and playing shows. I just want to be able to do what I love and live off of it and be happy with it; to just be happy with my life and my career.

What’s your favorite song that you wrote?

It’s a song that I put on SoundCloud; it’s called Trees. It’s basically like… okay, so I go to summer camp each summer and there’s this counselor there who has just shaped my life so incredibly over the last 4 years. And she has this little tattoo of a tree on her leg, just because she loves the outdoors, and I couldn’t stop thinking about it. So, I wrote her that song and it had trees in it and it was really fun and I liked it a lot.

What was the most challenging instrument to learn?

The guitar, because my hands don’t like to do 2 different things at once. I mean, piano does kind of do that but it’s more melodic in a sense because you can look down at it the whole time, while you can’t do that when you play the guitar usually, unless it’s classical. So, just learning how to do 2 different things at once is just really complicated for my brain.

Do you wish you were talented in any other way?

All the time, I mean, I go to an art school so I see all these fabulous people all the time. And even at school dances, I see all these dancers just going at it. And I just think, “I wish I could do that but I’m just not graceful,” or, “I wish I was better at drawing so I could have my art up somewhere.” I definitely wish that there was more than just music for me, but I’m also just really grateful that I even have music.

How has music affected your life?

I think it’s made me more independent. People who do music kind of have to do a lot of things for themselves. Like you have to book your own shows, so it’s made me not only independent, but it’s made me more able to talk to people and reach out and not be afraid of getting turned down because at least I tried. There’s always the possibility that you’ll get turned down, but there are all these opportunities if you don’t get turned down. And so, it’s made me kind of fearless in a way that’s just like, “this is me, and here I am.” If people don’t like it then that’s okay, but if they do, then I want to work with them and do something awesome.

What are you doing now in the art community?

Well, I recently booked a show with Realart, with a few different bands. One of them was actually from Arizona; they were touring and they came up here looking for a venue and I was like, “hey come to Realart, we have a show date already and you can hop in with some of us.” So I’m trying to book even more shows through Realart and other venues.

I actually volunteer at the YMCA, where I help out with things like Healthy Kids Day, where I basically just watch little kids play and do games with them.

Has working with the kids affected your music?

Yeah; kids are really inspiring just because they’re not afraid of failure. I actually have a little cousin and she falls down so much, but every time she falls, she gets right back up and she’s like “I’m fine,” and I just feel like that’s a metaphor for life. There are all these little kids that are so fearless and it makes me think that if they can do it then I can do it too.

Have any of your personal relationships affected your music? If so, how?

Yeah; I actually have an ex who I was in a band with, and when we broke up, the band basically broke up. And I think I’ve been a bit stupid in choosing to be in a band with my current partner, and it’s fine right now, but I’m always worried that, “if we break up then the band might break up?” Or, “will we be able to stick it out for the band?” But eventually that might go sideways, so my romantic relationships have definitely affected my music in really large ways just because of the decisions I’ve made. But also, breakups are really good for song inspiration [laughs].

What is your musical process?

A lot of crying, honestly, and a lot of self doubt. I’ll even write one line and think it’s not good enough, and then it’ll just spiral into me thinking that I’m not good enough and I’m not going to get anywhere. A lot of the times, it takes a few days to get yourself out of it and be like, “okay, you’re fine, keep writing.” The musical process for me is just really hard; it’s filled with a lot of anxiety around it about whether it will be good enough or what people will think. In the end, though, I just end up coming to terms with the fact that some people won’t like it. That’s how it’s always going to go. There are famous people who have people who don’t like their music. You just have to accept that and if you like it, that’s all that matters.

Do you make music for yourself or for others?

A little bit of both. Usually when I’m writing my music, it has a lot of meaning to me. There are lines that are seemingly not much to anybody else, but to me they mean a thousand words to the person I’m writing it to or the situation I’m writing about. So my music is a really good outlet for myself, but I definitely do consider what other people like and enjoy when I’m writing it. If I make a song too complicated or too simple, I feel like there will definitely be people who fall off the ends because they aren’t entertained or because there’s too much going on and they get too much in their head. I think you have to have that balance, to be a successful artist.

Do you have an ending statement for anyone who is afraid to spread their art?

The worst that can happen, is people won’t like it; but in all reality, that’s not even that bad. As long as your art makes you happy, that’s all that matters.

Go Check out Bryce’s social media on Instagram @bryceann.music and @bry.hartzell!

Teen Interview #12

Emma Brennan, 16.


What school do you attend?

I attend Curtis High School.

In schools, are athletics or arts more appreciated?

Athletics; It’s just an American thing. Everyone’s so into sports, it draws the biggest crowd. People love going to football games because they’re fun, and they are fun, but I think they should branch out and try to participate in other things. Go to a choir concert or something. I think that the American culture is so into sports; although it is into arts. We have the super bowl, people can’t really help it.

How has, or hasn’t your school impacted your contribution to the arts?

It has, there are a lot of opportunities to participate. I love being in orchestra choir. For theatre, there are a lot of opportunities, although I don’t get into all of them [laughs].They’re really fun; it’s really fun to be a part of a family when you do get into them.

How has the education system sparked, or ignored, the arts?

I feel like our school has a really good arts program. It could be better; I don’t understand the favoring of other clubs and sports over some arts. I know our art program at Curtis is really strong but at other schools, it’s lacking. Theatre departments are really underdeveloped, which is sad.

What are your art mediums?

My top one is music, but I love theater. Theater is right underneath it. Theater and music have just been really important to me. I’ve been singing and playing the piano for a really long time. I got into theater in the eighth grade. I play the cello and the piano. I used to take lessons, but I stopped that- classical lessons aren’t my thing. I always wish I could play the guitar since I love rock music. I wish I could play the electric guitar because they’re so cool! Anyone who plays the electric guitar—you’re winning!

Do you wish you were multitalented? In what?

I’ve always wanted to be athletic. I always make fun of myself and athletes. I’m so sorry, [laughs] but I wish I was them sometimes! I used to really play volleyball, but I can’t play at all anymore. In the arts I’m fine, but I’ve always wanted to be athletic. I’m a real faker, I always pretend to be [athletic].

What music genre do you feel should be more popular?

I like listening to classic rock and alternative rock, I dig that. Also, I love a good show tune.

Who do you look up to when you feel especially uninspired?

Oh gosh, it changes a lot. I really love this artist, her name is Joni Mitchell, her time has passed. Her lyrics are some of the greatest things I’ve ever heard in my life. Her style is underappreciated now because her time was in the 70’s. Her lyrics are crazy; I don’t know how someone can write like that. More recently I really like Sara Bareilles’ lyrics. The part of songs that I really think is important is the lyrics. Melodies are really important too. But what it’s saying… you know?

What qualifies as “art”?

Art is getting creative and creating something that you put a lot of effort into. It can be music or painting, but I don’t want to sectionalize it. It’s hard to explain but just getting creative and putting yourself into something, whatever that may be. You could say your school work is art if you’re putting yourself into it and enjoying what you’re doing.

What is an underrated art, in your opinion?

This is going to sound pushy, but I think theatre is very underappreciated. A whole bunch of people just try out, thinking it’s weird or out of their comfort zone, and they end up loving it. I know someone who did “one acts” for one year, and they went to minor in theatre in college. I think if you try out for a show, even if you don’t get in, it’s so fun. It will be the least judgemental audience you have.

How has participation in the arts changed your perspective on life and the world?

Before I wanted to do a practical job, just like everyone else wanted, but I didn’t know what that was. I feel like if I hadn’t found theatre or music, I would go to college not really knowing. I have found myself in the arts, and that is the only choice I gave myself; that is the only thing I want to do.

Do you think there should be a balance in art promotions between adults and youth?

I think there should be a balance. I’m not really into [visually] artistic stuff, but those young people are going to be the future. They deserve to have their work shown off and they deserve attention.

How do you think theatre affects Tacoma?

There’s a lot of community theaters in Tacoma, and just from our school, there are a lot of people who want to go and watch. I can imagine that’s something for people in Washington especially, our state is really into the arts. There are a bunch of opportunities to see live theater, and that’s really good.

Why is theatre so expensive and how can we change that?

Kids don’t know that it’s an option to get good tickets. Youth should get access to cheaper tickets. I think that it should have an accessible price option. It shouldn’t be too cheap, because it’s going to art, and that should always have money going into it, but it should still be accessible.

How can theatre improve in inclusiveness?

[By looking] from a different point of view. Maybe if they took a chance on people that they haven’t worked with before, get out of the same thing. I know at TMP, they have the same people on every single show and it would be cool to see them including different people, even if they don’t know them. If they show what they can do, and they’re good, I think they should make it.

What are your short-term and long-term goals in relation to the arts?

I really want to do theatre and music any chance I get. I don’t have to do it professionally or release my own music. Maybe if there is a choir within a city, I’ve seen those. I want to keep myself sharp in singing and regular music, instead of just doing theatre. I want to continue doing music and maybe even continue with orchestra-that’s gonna be harder. I hope to not lose that because it’s really special!

Emma in Les Misérables

 

Go follow Emma on Instagram! @Emmab253

Teen Interview #11

Hal Warren, 16. Lemmon, 17.


What type of genre would you label your own music?

Lemmon: You know, I think it’s definitely hip-hop, we kind of have our own flavor of originality within that, though.
Hal: Yeah. We’re rap and hip-hop for sure, but I feel like a lot of people put themselves in that box and they’re like, “Oh we’re this genre” and then people are like, “But you’re a rapper” or “You’re a Soundcloud rapper,” and I feel like that term gets thrown around a lot, but it’s like… we make music. And I think the expression of an artist shouldn’t be within one genre. People are inspired to make lots of different types of music that sounds different and that’s okay.

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Hal

How long has KID GENIUS been around?

Lemmon: A year.
Hal: Yeah, a little over a year.
Lemmon: We started last December. [Last] January was when we started actually writing songs.

What is the origin of the name?

Lemmon: It’s on you Hal.
Hal: Liam was producing a beat and I was really vibin’ with it, and I was like, “Dude, this is genius! You’re like a kid genius!” and it just kind of got thrown out and that was going to be the name of the song. And then we were like maybe we could start something. Then later I was like, “What should our name be?” and he said, “Kid Genius” and we weren’t set on it but it stuck.
Lemmon: Seemed good.
Hal: Yeah.

What role do you both play in the group?

Hal: I’m the rapper and vocalist and Liam’s the producer, so all of the instrumentals.
Lemmon: All of the music is from me.
Hal: We’ll make songs together, but he’s the mastermind behind all of the beats and all of the songs.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Lemmon: Mine comes from everywhere. It’s not just one person within the hip-hop genre, but it’s people from rock and roll or jazz or even classical music. Seeing how they can find their originality, find their sound within their genre is an inspiration to me. I guess that’s what we’re trying to do with our stuff.
Hal: He’s inspired by a lot of ambient stuff, like there’s this artist named John Hopkins that he really likes. I’ve been kind of obsessed with the whole underground scene. There are artists like Suicide Boys, Wifisfuneral, and Pouya and all these underground guys that aren’t mainstream. I have kind of been obsessed with that genre for a long time, and I have just recently begun to draw a lot of inspiration from local guys like Peasant Boys and I’ll fight you. And of course, the classics like Tupac and Biggie, Outkast and Public Enemy. Our next project really focuses on the root sounds, like when you think of hip-hop, like the old school beats and relatively simple flows. I also listen to a lot of heavy metal, and Counterparts.
Lemmon: I listen to whatever he listens to. He just tells me to listen to stuff and I go. We draw stuff from everywhere.

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Lemmon

What advice do you have for people just starting their own bands?

Lemmon: I would say take action and don’t be afraid. Know how much you want. If you’re doing it just for fun, that’s great. I find that with us, we’ve had a lot of talks about how far we want to go with it, and I feel like that’s important too. Your desire, and how much you love music.
Hal: If music doesn’t make you happy, you shouldn’t do it. People make music for every single reason you can possibly think of, and every single one of those reasons is valid. Like he said, if you’re gonna do it, really do it. It’s okay to be unsure. We don’t really know what we’re doing, we just like making music and we’re still figuring it out. Just start making stuff. Just do stuff; just make stuff. Start putting out music.

What motivates you to not give up?

Lemmon: I’m addicted to making music, so there’s no way I can quit.
Hal: Liam spends hours and hours and hours on end just on his computer making beats. He’s read entire books on Ableton. There are so many artists for everyone, that really means a lot to them and that has inspired them or helped them work through a section of their life that was really hard. So even the smallest possibility that our music, or something that I create, could help somebody else through something or inspire them or change their life even, just that small chance that I could touch one person, is the coolest thing for me. The fact that we can be a source of sanction for the people.
Lemmon: It’s giving back, you know?
Hal: Couldn’t say it any better.

What is the current project/goal you are working on right now?

Lemmon. Project and goals are two very different things.
Hal: Yeah.
Lemmon: Tell them about the project.
Hal: We very recently just started talking about our next project. We just dropped an EP called “Journey” that was kind of like our first step. Our first step is kind of like identifying it like, “okay we are really gonna do this.” But our next project is …we don’t really have a name for it yet.
Lemmon: Not yet.
Hal: We’re working on something, but there’s another EP in the works.

Is it luck, or hard work that shows results?

Lemmon: It’s luck- no.
Hal: Bro, you got to have hard work.
Lemmon: Some things are just natural, but at the end of the day, if you were to take someone who is naturally good at music versus someone who works every day at it, over a period of time I don’t think the person with luck is going to win.

What art besides music, do you find especially intriguing?

Lemmon: Photography is one thing I find very intriguing. It’s really cool that we can use it with our music with our album art. I’m very strict with album art.
Hal: Image is such an important thing.
Lemmon: You gotta find an image that blends with the music. You can’t have a heavy metal song with a picture of a butter-
Hal: Butterfly.
Lemmon: Or violin or something.
Hal: Well you can make anything out of anything.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

Hal: Hopefully in Los Angeles or somewhere in California making music. I mean, that’s our dream that we want.
Lemmon: That’s the target.
Hal: Yeah it’s to go to California. I kind of fell in love with it after a couple of trips. Every time I’m there I’m like, “This is where I’m supposed to be.” So hopefully there, doing this.

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How are success and fame different?

Lemmon: I mean, you can be an electrician and be successful, but not have fame, you know? What do you think about that, Hal?
Hal: I think success is very subjective; like very subjective.
Lemmon: I agree. It’s happiness.
Hal: I think success is contentment. One person’s success may be finally making that first song or playing their first show, or releasing their first project. While another person’s success may be having six albums go double platinum and selling out every major stadium in the US. Both of those are equal and valid success, but fame isn’t necessarily success. There are people who have gotten famous over the stupidest things.
Lemmon: Yeah,
Hal: Just because you’re famous doesn’t mean you’re successful.

Why is it important to recognize teen art?

Lemmon: They’re the future; teens are the future.
Hal: Everyone’s voice is valid. A lot of people say like, “You’re just a kid. You don’t know what you’re doing. You don’t know where you want to go you. You don’t know what you want to do.” And a lot of kids are like, “Yes I do.” And they don’t know how to express that. A lot of these kids are so creative and so different and they challenge certain ideas and they bring out these ideas and they bring out certain things and it’s like, listen to these kids! They have very important things to say. Every voice is valid.
Lemmon: It’s valid.
Hal: Its completely valid, and it’s a different perspective. And most of it is without an ego. I say that tentatively because there are a lot of kids that have big egos. But I think adults have the biggest egos. They’re like, “We know everything. We’re gonna teach you.” And it’s like, that’s true-they can teach you a lot, but like-
Lemmon: No.
Hal: Yeah.

How can Tacoma improve in highlighting work from teens?

Lemmon: Probably open up more places to play than just Realart.
Hal: There’s Louie G’s in Fife and there’s Realart. I feel like more places for specifically youth art to showcase, or more events for kids to meet other teen artists to network. I am very, very fortunate to be at SOTA with other art kids who make music. In any room, there’s anyone who can do anything, and you could potentially have all the musicians to make an album and all the artists to make artwork and all the people who know how to push that album. More of the local community, I guess.

Who is responsible for giving Teens a platform?

Hal: I think teens are going to have more initiative because adults are going to be more hesitant to invest in that, even though it makes more sense to invest in the future than other things. I think teens, and just kids, will have the better mindset for that, but in reality, adults have the resources and the positions to make these things happen.

Go check out Lemmon @Lemmonproductions and Hal @Halwarren_
And follow the two at @Kidgenius_
Also take a minute to listen to their music!